Expert Concrete Mildura

Concrete Stamping and Stencilling Mildura

If you are looking to spruce up your concrete footpaths, driveways or patios with a bit of flare, consider concrete stencilling or stamping. These simple tools will create an interesting pattern on the bland grey surface and give it some character!

Decorative concrete is a way to add uniqueness and interest to paths and driveways. It achieves the look of bricks or pavers, but it’s not as expensive as real brickwork would be.

And not just brickwork either; with concrete stamping and stencilling, you can mimic many different types of textures and patterns.

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concrete stamping Mildura

The answer to which concrete technique – stamping or stencilling – you should choose depends on what look you are aiming at, and how the material will relate aesthetically with your property.

concrete stencilling Mildura

Let’s look firstly at Concrete Stencilling.

This is a similar principle as when a child uses stencils to add patterns in their scrapbook pages, or when decorators use them on walls to create intricate designs. Baristas even sometimes apply this practice to coffee, to create their interesting designs!

Firstly, the concrete is laid down in the usual manner; poured, screeded and prepared. But just before the concrete becomes hard, the time for the stencilling begins.

A stencil is basically just a long roll of patterns; it is spread onto the concrete surface, and then pushed into the surface. More rolls are placed to fill out the area and continue the patterns. Colour Hardener is then sprinkled on to the surface of the concrete; this produces the colour, or new tint, for the new content, and can be made up of multiple Colour Hardeners to give it a really unique colour.

Following this, if you want to have a distinctive decorative finish, we can use what is known as a decorative roller. Using this, we can mimic the look of a number of different materials. If you don’t want this, you don’t have to have it. Instead, we can simply smooth out any rough spots.

Finally, the stencil is taken away, and you are left with your newly created patterned concrete surface.

Let’s look firstly at Concrete Stencilling.

This is a similar principle as when a child uses stencils to add patterns in their scrapbook pages, or when decorators use them on walls to create intricate designs. Baristas even sometimes apply this practice to coffee, to create their interesting designs!

Firstly, the concrete is laid down in the usual manner; poured, screeded and prepared. But just before the concrete becomes hard, the time for the stencilling begins.

A stencil is basically just a long roll of patterns; it is spread onto the concrete surface, and then pushed into the surface. More rolls are placed to fill out the area and continue the patterns. Colour Hardener is then sprinkled on to the surface of the concrete; this produces the colour, or new tint, for the new content, and can be made up of multiple Colour Hardeners to give it a really unique colour.

stamped concrete Mildura

Now, what about Concrete Stamping?

This process is more difficult than concrete stencilling. Where you might, in a pinch, be able to do concrete stencilling yourself, you’ll really need to bring in the experts to perform concrete stamping properly.

This complicated process needs an expert contractor and a small Goldilocks period of time in which to perform it. It requires the contractor to stand on the stamp, and if you begin the process too soon, the concrete is not firm enough to take the contractor’s weight, but if you begin it too late, you will not get an imprint.

There is that small ‘just right’ period of time when the concrete is neither too weak nor too strong.

Basically, the process is:

• We will apply the colour hardener. It may need more than one coat to get the right amount.

• We will then apply what is known as a release agent. This ensures the concrete and the stamps don’t stick to each other … but it can also give your concrete an interesting colour contrast.

• Then the stamps (polyurethane shapes) are set on to the concrete surface. The first stamp has to be perfectly straight, otherwise all following stamps will be imperfectly aligned.

• The stamps provide the pattern, but it is the contractor’s weight that provides the imprint.

• Some minor touch-ups may be required after they are removed.

• 12 to 24 hours later, when the concrete is washed and cured, numerous control joints will be cut into the concrete slab. These provide a number of stress reliefs points within the concrete itself, and can help in ensuring that random cracks do not appear.

• The last step is sealing the concrete.

Deciding whether you should choose stamped concrete or stencilled concrete depends on what you are planning to use it for. Stencilling works better for concrete surfaces that are more stable, where the traffic is less heavy … like a patio, or indoors.

On the other hand, if you are looking for something to use in an unstable environment where there will constantly be movement such as driveways or footpaths then stick with stamped concrete which works well in these environments.

Ultimately, it is your decision, but if you want to learn more, please call us. And if you want to begin your concrete stamping or stencilling job now, call us also for a free quote. You can also put your details in the contact form. Our staff is looking forward to working with you.

Now, what about Concrete Stamping?

This process is more difficult than concrete stencilling. Where you might, in a pinch, be able to do concrete stencilling yourself, you’ll really need to bring in the experts to perform concrete stamping properly.

This complicated process needs an expert contractor and a small Goldilocks period of time in which to perform it. It requires the contractor to stand on the stamp, and if you begin the process too soon, the concrete is not firm enough to take the contractor’s weight, but if you begin it too late, you will not get an imprint.

There is that small ‘just right’ period of time when the concrete is neither too weak nor too strong.